Tag Archives: Indian sweets

Festival of Lights

 

Yesterday was Diwali, which is the Indian festival of lights! It is also the observance of good over evil and is celebrated with clay lamps lit, sweets eaten, and in the company of those you love.

Diwali literally translates to “row of lamps” and so it is customary to light clay lamps along your pathway, in and around your home.

Since it was our first Diwali in our new home, REB and I celebrated! We had some delicious food for dinner, some sweets (I made his favorite – homemade kheer [Indian rice pudding] and we bought Jalebi (jah-lay-bee) [Indian version of a funnel cake]) and we lit some clay lamps outside! :)

Here are some scenes:

I hope you all have a wonderful year full of light, joy and happiness!

Mango burfi

Indian sweets are really sweet. I don’t care for a lot of them, but there are some I absolutely I can’t resist. I did a recipe earlier this year for kheer (Indian rice pudding), which is REB’s absolute favorite.

Yesterday, my awesome sister showed me how to make mango burfi. Burfi is basically a solid mixture of sugar, condensed milk and spices until it solidifies. It’s sweet and has a nice, soft texture. There are many variations: plain, pistachio, cashew, etc. What we made was mango, because face it, mangoes are delicious.

Here’s what you’ll need:
•2 cups ricotta cheese
•2 tablespoons butter
•3 cups dry milk powder
•1 1/2 teaspoons ground cardamom
•2 cups mango pulp (Canned)
•1 pinch ground nutmeg

Start by toasting the ricotta cheese in a saucepan over medium heat for 10 minutes. You need to stir it the entire time.
Once it starts drying out, add the butter and the dry milk powder and stir.
Once that’s incorporated and starts drying out, add the mango pulp.

Stir for 15 minutes then add the cardamom and the nutmeg. Taste the mixture to see if you need to add more sugar. Mango pulp is relatively sweet, so you shouldn’t need a lot of added sugar.  However, as I said, Indian desserts are sickeningly sweet, so feel free to add sugar to taste! Stir and cook this mixture until it starts pulling away from the sides of the saucepan, or until it starts taking shape. Oh! Another note: you’re stirring this the entire time, so use a spoon that won’t cramp up your hands.

To test it, take a little bit of the mixture and drop it on a plate. If you can touch the mixture without it sticking to your fingers, it’s done. You don’t want it to be sticky.

Pour the mixture into a greased pie pan or sheet pan and spread into an even layer. Cover and put it in the fridge to harden for 2-3 hours.

Optional garnishes are slivered almonds, crushed pistachios or edible foil.
Cut into squares and serve.